Archive for the ‘crime fiction’ Category

Among the many invocations piled upon the aspiring writer, “write what you know” is usually close to the top. Like most of them, this one can be overly interpreted to the absurd (in either direction); but in the main, I think it’s pretty good advice for Big Issues. I know a lot about the law and […]


If I may be permitted the occasional opportunity to crow, I woke up this morning to this link, supplied to me by my co-author, Susanne O’Leary: It might be only a fleeting instance, no one can predict these things. But I do know that, for this brief moment in time, everything you do to work […]


It looks like this Thanksgiving-Christmas holiday season is going to be Full Irish. This political suspense novel marks the return of Paul and Shannon Forté, several years after they had moved to Carmel following Paul’s acquittal on corruption charges. It also introduces Finola McGee, the brassy political editor of the Irish Telegraph, Dublin’s second biggest […]


For my biannual post on writing craft, I shall simply repeat three sentences: Omit needless words. Resist the urge to explain. Value the reader’s time. Thanks for the reminder, Kristen Lamb.


Hello, Friends! I have come into possession (legally) of a hatful of promotional codes that can be used on Audible.com to download the audiobook of Diary of a Small Fish – for FREE! All of the book marketing gurus urge that these be used to generate sales of the ebook version. Run a contest, they […]


A few weeks have passed since Susanne and I announced our collaboration, and I wish to report that the process so far has been superb. Through a series of emails and Skype conversations, we have tweaked and embellished the plot and put up >10,000 words. At this rate, we’d be done with a draft by […]


A new solicitation, with more detail: I am seeking a fellow writer of crime/mystery fiction to collaborate on up to a dozen novels during the next 4-5 years. I am looking for a natural plotter whose talent is building the framework for a complete story – beginning, middle and end. We would then collaborate on […]