Archive for the ‘law and lawyers’ Category

An Election, Another Explosion When Nixon was elected in November of 1968, things really began to heat up at Gadsby & Hannah. Colson’s work on Nixon’s behalf had been very much appreciated by Nixon (even if it wasn’t by some of his men), and the opportunities for recompense at the firm were going to be […]


Gadsby & Hannah Goes Bi-partisan It became apparent by the mid-sixties that Gadsby, Hannah, Colson & Morin was “too Republican.” Several of their clients, including Grumman’s Lew Evans, told them they should get a high-profile Democrat in the firm. It turned out that, at that very moment, Lynch’s pal Dick McGuire was looking for a […]


Growing Pains

14Jun16

While Morin was pulling pranks on Colson, he was also exceedingly busy with high-powered lawyering. By the mid-1960’s, Federated’s problems with the SEC were an almost constant source of work for Morin and his principal litigation partner, Joe Mitchell. His relationship with Federated, and in particular Jack Donahue and his senior team, Dick Fisher, John […]


Morin’s frenetic work pace did not distract him from preserving the office culture of well-planned pranks. He occasionally targeted another foil for his carbon trick: Colson himself. On one of these occasions, he  ensnared an unintentional victim. In January of 1967, Maine Congressman Stan Tupper was newly retired from Congress, looking for a law firm to […]


Morin wasted no time in developing a niche securities practice that brought him and the firm significant success. It began inconspicuously enough in the relatively small-time world of the Boston Stock Exchange, where small regional securities firms fought for a small number of small-issue public offerings that small New England companies could not afford to […]


Growth Spurt

31May16

With a rapid growth in new legal business during the latter part of 1960, the firm had to expand. By early 1961, the firm had about twenty-six lawyers, evenly split between Boston and Washington. Much of the workload entailed representing several Boston-based securities underwriters who were busy doing “Regulation A” private securities offerings, which had […]


In 1962, NASA solicited eleven firms to bid on the design and construction of the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) – a vehicle that would be capable of making a landing on the moon. While the invitation went to eleven firms, there were two major competitors. One was Martin-Marietta from Georgia, and the other was Grumman […]